Developing A Movement Sequence

Cap Kotz
2 min readOct 31, 2021

An individual movement can be as subtle as shifting your eyes or taking a step. For example, when you were a baby, you mostly moved your eyes, pursed your lips, and waved your hands in the air. Then, as you developed, you added turning over, crawling, walking, and finally, you ran and did all kinds of things. When individual movements are strung together, either intentionally as in dance or sports or arbitrarily as in play, they create a movement sequence.

A superficial judgment is manifested as a furrowed brow, tension in the face or shoulders. One judgment can lead to another until they form a movement sequence much like a dance, which is repeated. You might not be aware of it. The constant dance created by thoughts tells a feeling story, stories we are raised to ignore or bury. But, if not interrupted, these movement sequences, or dances, limit life force and expression.

Next time you stand in line, listen for thought judgments, typically having to do with the way someone looks, behaves, or the situational circumstance. Judgments can be very subtle, like, "that sweater is too big for her," meant as an objective observation. Possibly you are a tailor, and your observation is natural. But if there are ongoing judgments relating to her weight or the way she looks, you can guess you are doing a dance that is yours and not about her.

When I first practiced judgment identification while standing in line, I became aware of heightened tension in my body. It wasn't easy to stand still. The more people there were, the more I judged, with each thought creating a kind of protection dance.

When I became interested in switching up this dance, I practiced visualizing a scoop and dump judgment dance. First, I visualized each judgment dropping down through my body, pooling at my feet. Then, the pool got bigger, spreading out, providing a buffer between myself and the outside world. Judging equaled control and protection, but the price, the tension, was too big.

I picked up my trusty bucket, squatted down, scooped up the sticky stuff, and tossed it over my shoulder into a clearing station. This became my new movement sequence, and the next time I stood in line and noticed a judgment thought, I visualized this dance until I learned to stand in line without fear of attack.

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Cap Kotz

Writer and Story Mapping Guide, I follow the life path no matter how challenging.